Meet a Wilburforce Fellow: Sergio Avila

Sergio Avila, 2015 Wilburforce Fellow

The Wilburforce Fellowship in Conservation Science provides researchers with a unique opportunity to gain skills in science communication and leadership to further their conservation goals. Fellows from 2015, the first cohort, are sharing their experiences this week and next; to learn more and apply to be in the 2017 cohort, click here.

Sergio Avila leads collaborative efforts on connectivity for wildlife, and habitat restoration and conservation in northwest Sonora and southeast Arizona. He has found his niche as a bridge between cultures, languages and approaches to the conservation of biodiversity in the US-Mexico border. [Read more…]

2016 August Recess

At COMPASS, in addition to valuing scientists, connections, engagement, generosity, the environment, and working hard, we also value passion and balance. Because the pace and pulse of our work often reflects the pace of the academic and political calendars, August provides a chance for many of us to catch our breath. The blog will be taking a break too, and will be back after Labor Day! [Read more…]

Applications Open For The 2017 Wilburforce Fellowship In Conservation Science

Click here to download PDF.

The Wilburforce Foundation and COMPASS are excited to announce that applications are open for the second cohort of the Wilburforce Fellowship in Conservation Science.

The fellowship, which was designed to establish a supportive community of conservation scientists to effectively communicate their decision-relevant research, will begin in 2017. Fellows will participate in a six-day training in science communication, leadership, and engagement, and will receive support and coaching to reach their conservation goals throughout the fellowship year. The new cohort of fellows will join the 2015 fellows in building a network of skilled conservation scientists ready to contribute to action around conservation issues and solutions. [Read more…]

Happy Independence Day!

I was so thrilled to receive the official letter from the IRS stating COMPASS’ independent non-profit status.

It’s the Fourth of July—a day when we celebrate freedom, democracy, and independence. Our team is taking the time to celebrate with their loved ones this week, and we hope you’re able to as well! [Read more…]

Announcing the NACCB 2016 Journalist Fellows

COMPASS

COMPASS is proud to support a phenomenal group of reporters, editors, and producers to attend the 2016 North American Congress for Conservation Biology this July. The meeting is expected to bring over 1,000 conservation scientists and practitioners to Madison, WI for workshops, field trips, and symposia around the theme of Communicating Science for Conservation Action.  The pool of applicants was incredibly talented, and we thank everyone who expressed interest in this opportunity. [Read more…]

Making Communication Accessible

Barbara in the field.

We’re excited to share stories from scientists in their own words. This guest post is by Barbara Spiecker, a graduate student at Oregon State University (OSU). Barbara recently participated in a ‘Making Your Science Matter’ graduate seminar I teach each winter at OSU. Our staff, past and present, provide services such as graduate courses, seminars, and 1:1 coaching to their home institutions (e.g., National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis [NCEAS], OSU, and University of Washington) in exchange for office space. This year, I added a new element to the course – a capstone project. Students could choose to put their learning into practice in any form they liked – through websites, blogs, dance, radio, video, K-12 outreach. They blew me away with their passion, creativity, and willingness to share their why’s. Barbara created an inspiring video for More Than Scientists. Here’s her story.

Karen McLeod, COMPASS’ Managing Director [Read more…]

Thinking About Your Communication Goals And Objectives: An Interview With John Besley And Anthony Dudo

Chart from PLOS One paper showing how different communication objectives for scientists rank against each other. The point, Dudo and Besley say, is not how objectives rank but rather, that establishing clear objectives in service of your ultimate goals - whatever they may be - is most important.

I recently had the opportunity to talk with John Besley (Michigan State) and Anthony Dudo (University of Texas at Austin), two social scientists interested in the intersection of science, public engagement and communications. Their recent PLOS One paper described how scientists prioritize their communications objectives for public engagement. John and Anthony, both housed in in their institutions’ advertising and public relations departments, are working to help us understand the interfaces between scientists and the public. I had the privilege of talking with them about their work, motivations, and why scientists who are working to engage should care about their research. [Read more…]

Find Your Way Down The Slopes Of Engagement

Confidence and competence on the slopes of Mt. Hood, Oregon. Both are as vital to #scicomm as they are to skiing.

This winter, I’ve had the privilege to witness a bunch of kids learning to ski (admittedly, while finally truly learning to ski myself). While supporting my daughters – one a future Bode Miller downhill-bomber, and one who’s slightly more cautious but still a strong skier – I was struck by the many parallels (pun intended) between learning to ski and learning to engage beyond your peers. [Read more…]

Stories, Science, And The Sea: Sharing At IMCC

A little over a year ago, eight scientists stepped out of their comfort zones and took to the stage to share a piece of their worlds. Without leaving a dark auditorium in Glasgow, we were transported to a fish spawning site in Australia, a night dive full of glowing plankton in the Philippines, a reef rescue mission in the Seychelles and a lionfish hunt in the Caribbean. We heard of the experiences that inspired a scientist to start a non-profit organization that raises awareness of the importance and vulnerability of fish aggregations, and how another scientist gained the trust of local fishers to get a more complete picture of the community and ecosystem in which she was working.
[Read more…]

COMPASS 2015 Retreat

The COMPASS team

This week, the COMPASS staff is meeting up in Baltimore for our retreat. We’re practicing what we teach in our trainings – using the Message Box, figuring out our thinking styles and how they work together, working on our elevator speeches, and preparing for another year of supporting scientists to engage in the public discourse about the environment!

[Read more…]