Love It Or Hate It – Scientists And Journalists Need Each Other

Marina Joubert. Photo by Loretta Steyn

Marina Joubert, guest author of this post, researches science communication at the Centre for Research on Evaluation, Science, and Technology at Stellenbosch University, and launched the first-ever online course in science communication in Africa. She also serves on the scientific committee of the global Public Communication of Science and Technology network and is on the editorial boards of Science Communication and the Journal of Science Communication. We’re excited to share her insights in this post, as this is a topic that our team thinks about a lot (for more, see this post or this post). [Read more…]

Meet a Wilburforce Fellow: Erin Sexton

Erin Sexton, 2015 Wilburforce Fellow

The Wilburforce Fellowship in Conservation Science provides researchers with a unique opportunity to gain skills in science communication and leadership to further their conservation goals. Fellows from the 2015 cohort are sharing their experiences; applications to be in the 2017 cohort are due Friday, September 30. To learn more and apply, click here.

Erin Sexton is a Research Scientist and Regulatory Affairs Manager with the Institute on Ecosystems, at the University of Montana. Erin’s research focus encompasses the international landscape known as the Crown of the Continent Ecosystem, with an emphasis on aquatic ecology and conservation biology in the transboundary watersheds between British Columbia, Alberta, and Montana. [Read more…]

Meet A Wilburforce Fellow: Kyle Artelle

Kyle Artelle, 2015 Wilburforce Fellow. Image by Howard Humchitt.

The Wilburforce Fellowship in Conservation Science provides researchers with a unique opportunity to gain skills in science communication and leadership to further their conservation goals. Fellows from the 2015 cohort are sharing their experiences; applications to be in the 2017 cohort are due Friday, September 30. To learn more and apply, click here.

Kyle Artelle studies the ecology and conservation of wildlife, with a focus on black and grizzly bear population dynamics in the Great Bear Rainforest of British Columbia, bear-human conflict throughout the province, and wildlife management in general. He works to democratize ecological decision-making by sharing the best available knowledge and science with managers and the broader public. He is a biologist with Raincoast Conservation Foundation and a graduate student in the Earth2Ocean research group at Simon Fraser University. [Read more…]

Scientists And Journalists: Two Sides Of The Communication Coin

Amy (with Nancy Baron) at our 2015 Staff Retreat.

A few years ago, in one of my science writing classes at Johns Hopkins University, a guest speaker shared one of her most regrettable moments as a science journalist. She was a writer at the respected magazine Science News, and several years previously had covered a high-profile paper published in a top journal. Dutifully, she included in her story some of the figures from the paper that captured the essence of the findings. Only later did she (and others in the scientific and journalism communities) learn that those figures contained an error – one that obviously had slipped past the peer reviewers. She was mortified. “I should have checked the math myself,” she told the class. Printing something that was untrue was one of the worst sins she could have committed in her view; even though she had accurately reflected the findings published in the peer-reviewed paper.

As a new student in science journalism – after a long career in environmental science and policy – the incident was a revelation for me: I realized how much scientists and journalists are alike. Accuracy is critical to both them, and it forms the cornerstone of their professional life, namely, credibility. [Read more…]

Announcing the NACCB 2016 Journalist Fellows

COMPASS

COMPASS is proud to support a phenomenal group of reporters, editors, and producers to attend the 2016 North American Congress for Conservation Biology this July. The meeting is expected to bring over 1,000 conservation scientists and practitioners to Madison, WI for workshops, field trips, and symposia around the theme of Communicating Science for Conservation Action.  The pool of applicants was incredibly talented, and we thank everyone who expressed interest in this opportunity. [Read more…]

Highlighting Our #SciComm Advice: An Interview With The Forestry Source

Andrea Watt's Message Box from the

Our executive director, Brooke Smith, was interviewed by Andrea Watts for the May 2016 issue of The Forestry Source, a publication by the Society of American Foresters. This wide-ranging Q&A shares some of our tips, insights on working with media, thoughts about science and advocacy, a bit of our history, and inspiration for starting to engage. This was particularly fun because Andrea had participated in a COMPASS training when she was a graduate student at the University of Washington – she still has her message box from that training, which we are excited to share here! Enjoy. [Read more…]

Calling Canadian Journalists! NACCB 2016 Journalist Fellowship Update

Please click here for a downloadable version of the flyer.

We are pleased to announce that Canadian journalists will have an additional opportunity to apply to attend the North American Congress for Conservation Biology 2016 (NACCB 2016) in Madison, WI. The deadline for Canadian journalists to apply has been extended to May 1, 2016. [Read more…]

Pulling Back The Curtain At Oregon State University

Journalists Chris Joyce, Ed Jahn, Nicola Jones, and Ashley Ahearn at OSU. Image by Karen McLeod.

This post is co-authored by Sarah Sunu, and based on a panel moderated by Nancy Baron at Oregon State University on March 9, 2016. 

Culture is an important, but sometimes overlooked, aspect of communication. Understanding the behaviors, beliefs, and norms of your audience can (and should!) change how you talk about your own work. One key reason COMPASS brings journalists and policymakers to our communication trainings is to give scientists a window into their worlds. [Read more…]

Leading By Example: Communication Lessons Learned From Gulf of Mexico Scientists

Dr. Natalia Sidorovskaia.

In January, right after the holidays, Nancy Baron and I traveled to New Orleans to work with the leaders from the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (GoMRI) – a 10-year research program to investigate and understand the effect of oil spills on the environment and public health. The Gulf is the focus of a lot of investment in research these days, and these scientists are at the forefront, studying the effect of oil spills on the natural and human environment. This training brought together the Principal Investigators for the GoMRI Consortia, as well as several of the Research Board Members. These scientists are studying how oil and dispersants move in the ocean, the role of microbes in the reduction of oil, and the health of the marine and human communities around the Gulf, among other topics. [Read more…]

NACCB 2016 Journalist Fellowship

Panelists from the 2014 NACCB Opening Plenary 'Conservation Tapas: Small Bites of Big Issues'

We are very pleased to announce that COMPASS will be supporting travel fellowships for journalists to attend the third biennial North American Congress for Conservation Biology (NACCB) in Madison, Wisconsin this July. The theme for this conference is Communicating Science for Conservation Action, and will emphasize the need for effective communication across communities and fields of practice in conservation science. The 2014 NACCB conference drew over 1,000 participants to Missoula, Montana for field trips, symposia, trainings, workshops and short courses. [Read more…]