NACCB 2016 Journalist Fellowship

Panelists from the 2014 NACCB Opening Plenary 'Conservation Tapas: Small Bites of Big Issues'

We are very pleased to announce that COMPASS will be supporting travel fellowships for journalists to attend the third biennial North American Congress for Conservation Biology (NACCB) in Madison, Wisconsin this July. The theme for this conference is Communicating Science for Conservation Action, and will emphasize the need for effective communication across communities and fields of practice in conservation science. The 2014 NACCB conference drew over 1,000 participants to Missoula, Montana for field trips, symposia, trainings, workshops and short courses. [Read more…]

Getting Out There: Connecting With Journalists At Conferences

Nancy Baron

This post reflects media expertise on our team from Nancy Baron, Brooke Smith, and Amy Mathews Amos.

Have you ever found yourself at a conference, and noticed that the person sitting next to you in a session or waiting in line behind you at the coffee station had “PRESS” on their name tag? Next time you do, introduce yourself! It’s a pleasant change for journalists to have scientists actually approach them. Even if it doesn’t necessarily lead to coverage of your work, it will almost certainly be an interesting conversation and a valuable connection.

Large scientific conferences (like the upcoming AAAS Annual Meeting) tend to attract press –it’s a great way to meet a bunch of experts in the field in one place. If you’re headed to Washington, D.C. next week to attend AAAS, or will be attending another conference where press may be present, we have some pointers to help you navigate your way to journalists (see also our tips on finding your way to policymakers while you’re in D.C. or another policy hub). [Read more…]

Getting Out There: Making The Most Of Your Networks And Travels

Image by Meg Gilley.

Most of us have found ourselves in a new city for work or a conference, but how often have you taken advantage of the location to meet new people and expand your network? Maybe you’re planning to attend the AAAS Annual Meeting in February and you’re traveling all the way to Washington, D.C. This is a great opportunity to network and start to build relationships in the policy world.

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Mining Science for Stories: The Value of Journalist Fellows at the Society for Marine Mammalogy Meeting 2015 (#MARMAM15)

The SMM 2015 COMPASS Journalist Fellows introduce themselves to the conference. Photo by COMPASS staff.

What happens when you offer an opportunity for 14 journalists to rub shoulders with 2,500 scientists at the world’s premier conference of marine mammal science? To aid and abet connections between them, we designed opportunities for the scientists and journalists to interact and engage so that journalists could find great stories to share with the wider world. But how do you measure the value of an effort like this? [Read more…]

Our Stories: Jenna Jambeck – Communicating clearly in the spotlight

Dr. Jenna Jambeck, of the University of Georgia. Photo Credit: UGA/Andrew Davis Tucker.

We blog here with brief updates or reflections on our work, while our website provides examples and descriptions of what we do. We are excited to continue sharing our series of stories, focused on longer timelines and richer details. Today we posted a story about Jenna Jambeck and her experience sharing new research with the media, and how we helped her. Read more of our other stories here. [Read more…]

Do You Want Your Research To Change The World?

Society for Marine Mammalogy  2015 Conference panel "How To Make Your Science Matter." Panelists from left to right: Ken Weiss, David Malakoff, Charles Littnan, Marcia McNutt, Nick Gales, Jane Lubchenco, with Nancy Baron moderating.

At the 21st Biennial Conference on the Biology of Marine Mammals held last week, I  stood in front of a vast conference hall before a sea of faces. It’s hard to know your audience with a group this size. Yet my task was to try reach every one of them as the moderator of a COMPASS panel featuring scientists and journalists, called “How To Make Your Science Matter.”

To take the temperature in the room, I asked everyone in the auditorium a personal question: “Do you want your research to change the world? If the answer is yes, stand up.” Some 2,500 researchers, students, and managers sprang to their feet. I could not see a single person sitting.

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COMPASS At SMM 2015

San Francisco, image by Michael Craven (CC BY 2.0).

Next week, over 2,200 scientists will come together in San Francisco, CA for the Society for Marine Mammalogy’s 21st Biennial Conference on the Biology of Marine Mammals—and this year, they will be joined by an impressive group of fourteen journalists. These journalists have been awarded COMPASS travel fellowships to attend the conference and be a part of an intense week of engaging with scientists, hearing the latest research about marine mammals as sentinels of ocean issues, and ultimately sharing these stories with the wider world. [Read more…]

Briefing Debrief: “California’s Changing Oceans” Scientists Jenn Caselle, Francis Chan, Tessa Hill, And Kristy Kroeker

CA_Oceans_Briefing_2015

On November 4, 2015, four eminent scientists came to Sacramento to deliver a briefing about our changing oceans. From ocean acidification to low oxygen zones, the scientists described the challenges that will confront California’s marine ecosystems in the years ahead. They also described how marine protected areas and long-term monitoring are informing our understanding of ocean change. Following the briefing, the scientists took a moment to reflect on the challenges and opportunities associated with bringing science to policymakers. [Read more…]

Briefing Debrief: ‘Shoring Up’ Scientists Share Their Perspectives On Visiting The Hill

ShoringUp_capitol

As many of our readers know, COMPASS works with scientists to help them share their work with the wider world – especially journalists and policymakers. Last week, COMPASS worked with the American Meteorological Society to bring four researchers to Capitol Hill to talk about the role of natural infrastructure in coastal protection.

This week marks the anniversary of Hurricane Sandy, an event that catalyzed new federal investments and directives to understand how to build economic, community and ecological resilience for our nation’s coasts – efforts that have begun to bear fruit. This briefing brought together researchers to discuss the state of the science and our understanding of the benefits and trade-offs of using natural and nature-based approaches to enhance coastal resilience. See our previous blog post for more details.

As with all COMPASS policy events, our goal was to create an opportunity for the scientists to share what they know – and why it matters – with policymakers and to build relationships as trusted resources going forward.

Part of the fun is to hear from scientists what their experience was like. We asked them all a few questions about the day, and share some of their responses below.
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California’s Changing Oceans: A Sacramento, CA Briefing On Implications Of Ocean Change For Policy And Management

Photo Credit: the_tahoe_guy, (CC BY 2.0)

 On November 4th, COMPASS is supporting scientists to share their knowledge about changes in the ocean, and what those changes mean for our coasts, managers, and decision-makers. Occurring just before the Annual Meeting of the Western Society of Naturalists this year in Sacramento, this event will help scientists attending to connect with state policymakers. We hope you’ll be able to join us!

UPDATE: Thank you to all who attended! We’ve provided the slides and handout from the speakers below.

[Read more…]