About Us: Heather Mannix

newzealand

COMPASS has welcomed a number of new folks to our team recently, and so we’re reviving our “About Us” series to introduce them. This week’s focus is Heather Mannix. Heather is our Science Engagement Specialist, and the author of a recent blog post on the role of boundary organizations.

At COMPASS, Heather works to connect science and scientists to relevant policy conversations. Heather’s experience working with U.S. and international policy motivated her to work for an organization that bridges the boundary between science and policy. She says, “I saw firsthand the value that science had for policy decisions but also that there are times when the mechanisms to share science can fail for reasons unrelated to the quality of the information – you really do need a guide to navigate the boundary. Learning this motivated me to work in a way that recognizes how important the mechanisms are, and that those opportunities to share science have to be well crafted.”

More about Heather …

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Greetings From Retreat

The COMPASS team just before stand-up paddle-boarding on the Willamette. Clockwise from top left, Erin Moomey, Karmel James, Sarah Sunu, Leslie Rutberg, Heather Galindo, Erica Goldman, Karen McLeod, Nancy Baron, Chad English, Megan Dearden, Heather Mannix, Liz Neeley, Brooke Smith, Heather Reiff, Kenny Maher.

We are taking a break from the blog this week to attend COMPASS’€™ annual board and staff retreat. As a distributed organization, we highly value the time we can spend together, face to face. This week we’re in Portland, Oregon to reflect on the last fifteen years of our work, take stock of our evolution, and look ahead to see how COMPASS can continue to connect science to conversations that matter. We are also welcoming four new staff members who we look forward to introducing through this blog in coming weeks. See you next week!

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Navigating The Boundary

boundary bridge 2

I’m excited to be writing my first blog post as a new member of the COMPASS team. I joined COMPASS two months ago, and one of the facets of work here that I’m particularly excited by is COMPASS’ role as a boundary organization. Boundary organizations are so named because they sit at the “boundary” between science and non-science. COMPASS has traditionally helped scientists navigate across the boundaries separating science from policy and media, although we are increasingly exploring ways we can support scientists to cross boundaries to connect with business, legal and other communities as well.  A relatively new term, the definition and theory of “boundary organizations” began to coalesce in the early 2000s, but the role that boundary organizations play – the seat between science and non-science – has been evolving over a much longer timescale.

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